10 Years of PhyreEngine™

Almost exactly 10 years ago, at a global SCE R&D meeting following the SIGGRAPH graphics conference, the decision was made to start to work on a graphics engine for PlayStation 3.

In the beginning

Initially codenamed Pootle, the aim was to provide a graphics engine for the upcoming PlayStation 3 with the intention of being used as both an engine for games development and a technical reference for future PlayStation 3 developers. Research began in SCEI’s European R&D team on the best ways to take advantage of the platform’s unique features such as the Synergistic Processing Units (SPUs – blindingly fast processors that need to be well treated to obtain maximum performance).

From the start there were several goals for the project:

  • It would be given away for free to all licensed PlayStation 3 developers to ensure all developers could access it.
  • It would be provided as source to allow developers to see how it works for research and debugging, taking any parts they need, or adding new functionality.
  • It would be cross-platform, at least in terms of licensing, so that developers could use it without having to exclusively target PlayStation 3 (to this day developers are still surprised we allow this).

To allow this last feature, the source was written to support multiple platforms including PC. Providing support for PC also meant that developers could use familiar PC tools to get started, transitioning to PlayStation specific tools to further tailor their title to the platform. Later we also decided to include ‘game templates’, more fully featured example code, representative of particular game genres, with all of the artwork included to show how it’s done.

Introduced to the world

PhyreEngine was first shown to the larger world at the 2006 Develop conference in Brighton, at that stage referred to as “PSSG”, named in line with other SDK components, where I presented the development process of one of our game templates to an audience mostly populated with the PhyreEngine faithful.

It next surfaced at Games Developer Conference (GDC) (slides), where we re-launched the engine with a new, more memorable name and a lot of enhancements. PhyreEngine took PSSG and extended it from a graphics engine to a game engine by adding common gameplay features such as physics, audio, and terrain. This coincided nicely with Chris Eden’s presentation “Making Games for the PlayStation Network” combining the low cost of PlayStation 3 debug kits with the free code and examples that you need to get started writing a game.

Terrain

The following year, PhyreEngine returned to GDC to announce PhyreEngine 2.4.0. This was the first time we were able to gather a long list of very happy PhyreEngine users to share their experiences using PhyreEngine. Along with the developers directly using PhyreEngine for their titles, we also heard from CTOs that used PhyreEngine for reference. This was highlighted in Matt’s Swoboda’s talk “Deferred Lighting and Post Processing on PlayStation 3” showing advanced research on the use of the SPUs to accelerate post processing techniques – techniques which are now the back-bone of many other rendering engines.

PostProcessing09b

New platforms

2010 saw the release of PhyreEngine for PSP, bringing the engine to PSP based on interest from the PSP development community. Matt came back to GDC in 2011 to introduce PhyreEngine 3.0. This newer version was better designed for modern multicore architectures, focusing on PS Vita and laying the ground-work for PlayStation 4, while taking the best parts of PlayStation 3 support from PhyreEngine 2. The presentation also dived deeply into some of the new technology and showed our latest game template, an indoor game using the new navigation and AI scripting features and showing rendering techniques that allowed us to reproduce the same beautiful image on PlayStation 3 and Vita.

SpaceStation

At the 2013 GDC this March we announced PhyreEngine 3.5. This was the third release of PhyreEngine 3 to support PlayStation 4 and our cross-platform approach meant that any developers already using PhyreEngine 3 on PlayStation 3 or PS Vita could take their title to PlayStation 4 with minimal changes. We were lucky to have worked in collaboration with other SDK teams to be able to provide feedback and develop early versions of PhyreEngine that could be used by other developers with early access to the platform.

We’ve also been working the the PS.First team to provide PhyreEngine to universities and academic groups. This is a video from Birmingham University’s GamerCamp from this last year using PhyreEngine.

The numbers so far

At the time of writing, PhyreEngine has been used in at least 130 games released on PlayStation consoles alone. I say “at least” because the PhyreEngine license is very liberal, and developers don’t even have to tell us they’re using it, let alone include a credit. These 130 titles come from at least 58 different studios and more than 11 of those studios have released 4 or more games. There’s also a fair split between retail and digital with 61% of titles being digital-only. This also does not include any titles from developers who have taken advantage of our open approach, and utilised components of PhyreEngine in their own engines. These games cover a wide range of genre and platform (indeed, many of the titles appear on multiple platforms), and we’re proud of the tiny role we’ve had in each and every one of them.

The future

PhyreEngine provided support for PS4 with one of the earliest pre-release SDKs so that it was able to form the graphical base for the IDU (interactive display unit) software that will be used around the world in shops to showcase launch games, as well as at least six games being released during the initial launch window. One already announced is Secret Ponchos from Switchblade Monkeys – hopefully we’ll be able to introduce more of them sometime soon! We currently estimate 50 titles in development too so we expect to be busy for quite a while.

Thanks

We’d like to thank our developer community for all the great games they’ve made with PhyreEngine over the years, and we hope to see many more in the future. You guys are awesome – and probably a little bit crazy – and we love you all.